At least once a year, the media report on a seemingly healthy teenage athlete collapsing during a sports game and dying of heart complications. These incidents continue to outline the importance of physical exams and health screenings for teenagers, especially those who play sports. During these health screenings, examiners check for cardiovascular alterations such as heart murmurs because they can be a sign of an underlying heart disorder. Since many heart alterations rarely have symptoms, they are easy to miss if health professionals are not specifically looking for them. Once cardiovascular alterations are identified in patients, it is important to refer them to specialists who can further investigate the cause. Consider the following scenario: A 16-year-old male presents for a sports participation examination. He has no significant medical history and no family history suggestive of risk for premature cardiac death. The patient is examined while sitting slightly recumbent on the exam table and the advanced practice nurse appreciates a grade II/VI systolic murmur heard loudest at the apex of the heart. Other physical findings are within normal limits, the patient denies any cardiovascular symptoms, and a neuromuscular examination is within normal limits. He is cleared with no activity restriction. Later in the season he collapses on the field and dies. Write a description of how you would diagnose and prescribe treatment for the patient in the scenario. Then explain how the factor you selected might impact the diagnosis and prescription of treatment for that patient. Purchase the answer to view it

Diagnosis and Treatment for Patient with Cardiovascular Alterations

In the given scenario, a 16-year-old male presents for a sports participation examination. He has no significant medical history and no family history suggesting risk for premature cardiac death. During the examination, an advanced practice nurse detects a grade II/VI systolic murmur, which is heard loudest at the apex of the heart. All other physical findings are within normal limits, the patient denies any cardiovascular symptoms, and a neuromuscular examination is also normal. Despite this seemingly minor finding, the patient subsequently collapses on the field and dies later in the season. In this case, the diagnosis and treatment of the patient would involve a thorough evaluation of the cardiovascular system and consideration of potential causes for the murmur. Additionally, the impact of the identified factor, i.e., the grade II/VI systolic murmur, on the diagnosis and treatment would need to be explored.

To diagnose the patient, further assessment of the cardiovascular system is necessary, including a detailed history, physical examination, and additional diagnostic tests. The history should aim to elicit symptoms related to cardiovascular abnormalities such as chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, or fainting. Additionally, the family history should be revisited, considering any previously unrecognized risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The physical examination should focus primarily on the cardiovascular system, including auscultation of the heart, assessment of blood pressure, and examination of peripheral pulses. In this particular case, further investigation of the murmur is warranted, including assessment of its quality, timing, radiation, and changes with maneuvers. Based on the findings of the history and physical examination, further diagnostic tests may be indicated. These may include an electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography, stress testing, or cardiology consultation.

The diagnosis for this patient can vary depending on the underlying cause of the murmur. A grade II/VI systolic murmur can be indicative of several cardiovascular alterations, such as aortic stenosis, mitral valve regurgitation, or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, the absence of symptoms and normal physical findings do not rule out the presence of an underlying cardiac condition. Therefore, the potential impact of this factor, i.e., the grade II/VI systolic murmur, on the diagnosis and treatment is critical and may have been overlooked in this scenario.

The identification of a murmur, even of lower intensity, should raise concerns about potential cardiac abnormalities, especially in a young athlete who subsequently collapses and dies. In this context, the absence of symptoms and normal physical findings can be misleading. These factors may have led the advanced practice nurse to clear the patient for sports participation without further investigation or referral to a cardiologist. It is essential to recognize that cardiovascular alterations, especially when they are asymptomatic, can have serious consequences, and thorough evaluation is necessary to ensure appropriate diagnosis and treatment. The presence of a murmur indicates the need for further investigation, given its potential association with underlying cardiovascular pathology.

In conclusion, the diagnosis and treatment for a patient with cardiovascular alterations, as highlighted in the given scenario, require a comprehensive evaluation of the cardiovascular system. The identification of a grade II/VI systolic murmur should raise concerns and prompt further investigation. Additional diagnostic tests, such as an ECG, echocardiography, or consultation with a cardiologist, may be warranted to determine the underlying cause of the murmur and possible associated cardiovascular abnormalities. In this case, the absence of symptoms and normal physical findings should not have overshadowed the potential impact of the murmur, leading to a more thorough evaluation and appropriate referral for further investigation and treatment. Taking these steps is crucial in preventing catastrophic events such as sudden cardiac death in young athletes.