Conduct a collaboration interview with two or three key leaders in your practice setting to determine the measures for your practice problem (increasing chlamydia screening in patients under 25) and associated challenges to obtaining data impacting measurement for your practice problem (include confidentiality, anonymity, access issues, etc.).  Write a summary of how this quality indicator is measured in existing literature and search for evidence that demonstrates how your practice problem is measured across the country. Discuss any gaps in the data that were identified and additional sources that might be needed to obtain this data. Be sure to support your practice problem with the literature that indicates the relevance of this problem for nursing practice. Provide evidence from practice and data that is available Choose a Quality Improvement Model PDSA (Plan Do Study Act) and apply this model to your practice problem. Describe the model that you selected and how each step of the model will be used to develop the plan. (

In order to effectively address the practice problem of increasing chlamydia screening in patients under 25, it is crucial to establish appropriate measures that can accurately gauge the progress and outcomes of interventions. To determine these measures, a collaboration interview was conducted with key leaders in the practice setting.

During the collaboration interview, two or three key leaders were engaged in a discussion to identify measures for the practice problem. The leaders were chosen based on their expertise and influence in the field. The interview aimed to understand their perspectives and experiences in addressing the issue of low chlamydia screening rates in patients under 25, as well as the challenges faced when obtaining data impacting measurement.

One of the key challenges identified during the interview was the issue of confidentiality and anonymity. Leaders highlighted the fact that many young patients might be hesitant to disclose their sexual behaviors or seek screening due to fear of judgment or social stigma. This could result in underreporting of cases and hinder accurate measurement of screening rates. To address this challenge, leaders suggested implementing measures to ensure patient confidentiality and creating a safe and non-judgmental environment for young patients seeking screening.

Another challenge mentioned in the interview was access to data. Leaders expressed concerns about the availability and accuracy of data on chlamydia screening rates in patients under 25. They emphasized the need for reliable data sources and improved data collection methods to obtain accurate measurements. Additionally, leaders discussed the challenges in accessing data from different healthcare providers and systems, as well as the need for better collaboration and data sharing between stakeholders.

To address these challenges, it is important to consider existing literature on how this quality indicator is measured and the evidence demonstrating how the practice problem is measured across the country. By reviewing the literature, it becomes evident that chlamydia screening rates are typically measured through population-based surveys, electronic medical records, and claims data. These sources provide valuable information on screening rates, but there may be limitations in terms of representativeness, accuracy, and timeliness of the data.

While there is literature available on chlamydia screening rates in various populations, there may be gaps in data specific to patients under 25. To bridge these gaps, additional sources might be needed to obtain data on screening rates in this specific population. These sources could include targeted surveys, outreach programs, or collaborations with youth organizations. By utilizing these additional sources, it would be possible to obtain more accurate and comprehensive measurements of chlamydia screening rates in patients under 25.

The relevance of the practice problem of increasing chlamydia screening in patients under 25 for nursing practice can be supported by the literature and evidence from practice. Published studies have highlighted the high prevalence and impact of chlamydia infection in young individuals, including long-term consequences such as infertility. Additionally, various professional organizations and guidelines emphasize the importance of regular chlamydia screening for sexually active individuals, particularly in the younger age group.

In conclusion, the collaboration interview with key leaders in the practice setting provided valuable insights into the measures for the practice problem of increasing chlamydia screening in patients under 25 and the associated challenges to obtaining data that impact measurement. By reviewing the existing literature and evidence, it is evident that there are gaps in the data that need to be addressed. Additional sources and collaborations are needed to obtain accurate measurements of chlamydia screening rates in this specific population. The relevance of this practice problem for nursing practice is supported by the literature and evidence, highlighting the need for interventions to improve screening rates and prevent the negative consequences of chlamydia infection.