HCA 255 Executive branch policies may differ from the needs of public health policy

HCA 255 TOPIC 2 DQ 1 (Two Responses)

Executive branch policies may differ from the needs of public health policy.  Almost 5% of the world’s population died of the Spanish flu during World War I, possibly because the spread of the disease was not shared because it was thought that the public may not support the war effort.  Provide another example of a time in U.S. history when an executive policy contradicted a health policy.

Answer:

One of the clearest examples of a time when an executive policy contradicted a public health policy is the spread of the Spanish influenza.  In 1918, world war one was raging on the Western Front.  Millions of soldiers were stationed in trenches, waiting for the right moment to attack their opponents.  Many soldiers were killed and wounded in trench warfare that occurred during World War I, but millions also died from influenza, or “the flu”.

One example of a time in U.S. history that an executive branch policy contradicted a public health policy is when President Richard Nixon promoted the use of condoms for birth control in 1969, but still banned their use as evidence of prostitution in 1972.  Nixon was both promoting the use of condoms to avert the spread of HIV, and yet banning them as evidence, to hide the actual use of prostitutes – which promote health risks, rather than preventing the spread of disease (Ford).

Public health policies are sometimes not the same as those of the executive branch. For example, U.S. military intelligence officers believed that the public would have been alarmed by the effects of the Spanish Flu, so they kept its existence a secret even though it was killing millions of people around the world, including soldiers fighting in Europe.

All governments have to make decisions that may not be popular with the public.  For example, during the 1900’s in the United States, approximately half a million people died from Spanish flu . No one wanted to publicize this because it would hurt morale and cripple the country’s war effort. The decision was made, therefore, to keep quiet about it.

The 2010 Affordable Care Act expanded the public’s access to health services, but arguably made few strides in creating healthier communities or improving population health.  Examine why this may be the case, discuss other considerations for public policy change (e.g., political, financial), and supply one example from your own experience that would support your point of view.

Sometimes, public health needs to be put before the interests of the people. For instance, during World War I the Spanish flu killed millions of soldiers stationed abroad. There were even cases in the United States, but public officials kept news of the flu under wraps to avoid causing public panic and putting a damper on U.S. morale as it supported troops across seas.

One example is the Spanish flu during the time of World War I. The virus spread throughout Europe and the United States and killed over 50 million people worldwide. The United States government did not inform the public about all the facts surrounding this flu epidemic, so many citizens died because they did not know how to take on preventative measures, such as using hand sanitizer.

Question:

Executive branch policies may differ from the needs of public health policy.  Almost 5% of the world’s population died of the Spanish flu during World War I, possibly because the spread of the disease was not shared because it was thought that the public may not support the war effort.  Provide another example of a time in U.S. history when an executive policy contradicted a health policy.

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