Following are two passages from Florence Nightingale’s Now the medical man who sees the patient only once a day or even only once or twice a week, cannot possibly tell this without the assistance of the patient himself, or of those who are in constant observation on the patient. The utmost the medical man can tell is whether the patient is weaker or stronger at this visit than he was at the last visit. I should therefore say that incomparably the most important office of the nurse, after she has taken care of the patient’s air, is to take care to observe the effect of his food, and report it to the medical attendant. (1860, Section VII, para.14) To be “in charge” is certainly not only to carry out the proper measures yourself but to see that everyone else does so too; to see that no one either willfully or ignorantly thwarts or prevents such measures. It is neither to do everything yourself nor to appoint a number of people to each duty, but to ensure that each does that duty to which he is appointed. This is the meaning which must be attached to the word by (above all) those “in charge” of sick, whether of numbers or of individuals. (1860, Section III, para.25) Answer the following: You must answer both questions by making an argument for your position. Whichever type – or – you find the passage to be, you must write an argument that will prove your answer to be correct. Purchase the answer to view it Purchase the answer to view it

Florence Nightingale’s passages highlight the importance of observation and supervision in healthcare settings. In the first passage, Nightingale emphasizes the role of the nurse in observing and reporting on the patient’s condition, particularly in relation to their food intake. The second passage focuses on the responsibility of those “in charge” to ensure that proper measures are taken and that no one hinders or obstructs those measures.

From a literary perspective, both passages can be seen as persuasive arguments aimed at emphasizing the crucial role of observation and supervision in healthcare. Nightingale presents her arguments clearly and supports them with logical reasoning.

From a genre perspective, the passages can be classified as expository texts. Expository writing aims to inform or explain a topic in a clear and logical manner. In these passages, Nightingale is explaining the importance of observation and supervision in healthcare. She presents her ideas in a reasoned and factual manner, using evidence and examples to support her arguments.

Another genre that can be attributed to these passages is argumentative writing. Argumentative writing involves presenting a claim or thesis and providing supporting evidence to convince the reader of its validity. Nightingale argues that the role of the nurse is not just to provide care but also to observe and report on the patient’s condition. She argues that those in charge have the responsibility to ensure that proper measures are taken. To support her arguments, Nightingale appeals to the authority of medical knowledge and the need for accurate information to guide medical interventions.

In terms of the type of argument presented in the passages, they can be categorized as deductive arguments. Deductive arguments use general premises to derive specific conclusions. In the first passage, Nightingale starts with the premise that the medical man cannot fully understand the patient’s condition without the assistance of observations from the nurse or caregivers. From this premise, she concludes that observing the effect of food and reporting it to the medical attendant is the most important role of the nurse after taking care of the patient’s air. In the second passage, Nightingale starts with the premise that being “in charge” involves ensuring that proper measures are carried out. From this premise, she concludes that being “in charge” does not mean doing everything oneself but rather overseeing that each person assigned to a duty fulfills it. Nightingale’s arguments are based on logical reasoning and draw conclusions from the premises she presents.

In conclusion, Florence Nightingale’s passages can be classified as expository and argumentative texts. They are written in a clear and logical manner, aiming to inform and convince the reader of the importance of observation and supervision in healthcare. Nightingale presents deductive arguments, using premises to derive specific conclusions. These passages showcase Nightingale’s expertise in nursing and her ability to articulate her ideas persuasively.