HCA 255 TOPIC 2 DQ 1 (Two Responses) Executive branch policies may differ from the needs of public health policy.

HCA 255 TOPIC 2 DQ 1 (Two Responses)

Executive branch policies may differ from the needs of public health policy.  Almost 5% of the world’s population died of the Spanish flu during World War I, possibly because the spread of the disease was not shared because it was thought that the public may not support the war effort.  Provide another example of a time in U.S. history when an executive policy contradicted a health policy.

Answer:

Executive policies have a long history of contradicting public health policy. In the early twentieth century, the Spanish Flu pandemic killed over five percent of the world’s population, and experts believe its spread was accelerated by governmental secrecy surrounding the outbreak.

It’s easy to see why the government might want to keep information about an epidemic under wraps: they didn’t want people to know that there was a deadly disease spreading across their borders, and they didn’t want people to panic. But if people didn’t know about it, how could they take precautions?

The government also kept quiet about the outbreak because they thought it might hurt morale during wartime—people were already stressed out about fighting in World War I, and learning about an illness like this could make them feel even more worried or depressed. But this just shows how ill-equipped our leaders were for dealing with such a major crisis: when lives are at stake, you can’t start worrying about whether or not your policies will affect morale!

Question:

HCA 255 TOPIC 2 DQ 1 (Two Responses)

Executive branch policies may differ from the needs of public health policy.  Almost 5% of the world’s population died of the Spanish flu during World War I, possibly because the spread of the disease was not shared because it was thought that the public may not support the war effort.  Provide another example of a time in U.S. history when an executive policy contradicted a health policy.

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