HCA 530 Topic 2 DQ 1 How would you react to a physician who wants the organization to purchase a new piece of technology that the competing hospital has so he can bring his patients to your hospital rather than the competition?

HCA 530 Topic 2 DQ 1
How would you react to a physician who wants the organization to purchase a new piece of technology that the competing hospital has so he can bring his patients to your hospital rather than the competition? What factors would you consider in evaluating the wisdom of supporting his request?

Answer:

How would you react to a physician who wants the organization to purchase a new piece of technology that the competing hospital has so he can bring his patients to your hospital rather than the competition? What factors would you consider in evaluating the wisdom of supporting his request?

a physician who wants the organization to purchase a new piece of technology that the competing hospital has so he can bring his patients to your hospital rather than the competition? What factors would you consider in evaluating the wisdom of supporting his request?

I would be wary of any physician who wants the organization to purchase a new piece of technology that the competing hospital has, as it seems likely that this physician is looking out for himself more than he is looking out for the organization. I would have concerns that this doctor may be trying to use the new technology as a way to bring his patients to your hospital rather than bringing them to the competitor’s hospital. This could signal that the doctor’s loyalties may be divided and could impact his or her willingness to work in cooperation with other physicians within your hospital, potentially affecting the quality of care given to patients.

The factors I would consider in evaluating the wisdom of supporting this request include whether or not purchasing the technology will improve patient outcomes and if there are alternative ways of acquiring similar technology. If purchasing this technology will improve patient outcomes and if there aren’t other ways of acquiring similar technology, then it might be worth considering purchasing. However, I would also consider whether this physician will be willing to cooperate with other physicians in your organization so that you can ensure that all patients are receiving quality care.

The key to this situation is communication. If a physician asked me to make an investment that would benefit him personally, I would need to ask him some questions to get as much information as possible:

-Does the competing hospital have better outcomes than our hospital because of this technology? If so, why? Does it really stem from the technology itself, or is it due to other factors we can’t change (like proximity to a major trauma center)?

-What kind of track record does the doctor have? Do they regularly make recommendations that result in positive changes for their patients, or are their suggestions usually off-base and based on personal preference?

-How many patients did the physician bring in last year, and how many did he send elsewhere? What percentage of his patient load came from referrals? Has this remained consistent over time, or has it fluctuated significantly?

After gathering as much data as I could about the physician’s history and what kind of impact his request could have on the organization, I would decide if it was worth pursuing. It’s important that I don’t punish a physician for asking what he needs in order to serve his patients best—but I also want to be sure that I’m not making a decision that could hurt the financial health of

I would probably be very excited to hear that a physician wanted the organization to purchase a new piece of technology, since this would likely mean that we would be able to get more patients and make more money.

But I would have to consider a few things before approving the purchase. For example, I would have to make sure that the new technology was actually necessary—that it wasn’t something we could do effectively with our current technology. If there are effective alternatives, then the competition is most likely simply trying to convince us to buy new tech so they can get rid of their old tech and purchase new stuff for themselves. Just because they’re doing it doesn’t mean we have to follow suit!

Another thing I’d have to consider is whether or not this new piece of tech would be worth the investment. Even if it’s something we need, that doesn’t always mean we can afford it. And even if it’s in our budget, we may want to save our money for other upgrades that are going to give us a bigger boost in the long run.

As a manager, you are always responsible for making the best financial decisions for your organization. But it’s also important to remember that you’re a people manager, too, and that relationships with both internal and external stakeholders are crucial to your long-term success.

In evaluating the wisdom of the request, I would ask myself the following questions:

What is the new piece of technology? How expensive is it? What value will it add to the organization? Will we need to raise prices or cut back on other services in order to afford it?

How much business does he bring in? How many patients does he treat at our facility versus at our competitor’s facility? Will this purchase allow us to compete with them more effectively?

Is there another way we can meet his needs without purchasing an expensive new piece of technology? Can we work out a better contract with him that will give him what he needs without necessarily investing in a major new purchase?

It’s not surprising that you’d want to keep your patients close to home, especially considering the competing hospital is so close by!

But before we agree to make any purchases, let’s take a look at a few factors.

First, what kind of technology are we talking about? Is this something that would be used only for your patients, or something available to all of our patients? How much would it cost to maintain this technology? Will this technology help us grow in other ways?

Second, what kind of impact does this piece of technology have on the rest of the organization? Would it cause any budgetary restrictions for other departments?

Third, let’s make sure the new technology won’t just help you out. Does it align with our organizational goals and mission statement?

In an ideal world, we’d all be able to provide the best possible care for our patients, regardless of cost or inconvenience. Sometimes that’s not possible.

If a piece of equipment is absolutely necessary and your hospital doesn’t have it, it might make sense to get it. If it’s only useful in certain cases, you might decide to refer those patients out to other facilities instead.

Profit and loss are important considerations here—it might not be worth the expense if you don’t think the investment will pay off. You may also want to consider convenience—is this device portable? Can it be used on many different patients? How much space and staff time will it require? In most cases, I think this is a decision best made by a team of professionals with expertise in a variety of areas.

Question:

HCA 530 Topic 2 DQ 1
How would you react to a physician who wants the organization to purchase a new piece of technology that the competing hospital has so he can bring his patients to your hospital rather than the competition? What factors would you consider in evaluating the wisdom of supporting his request?

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