HCA 545 Module 1 DQ 1 Using the example of a governance team following a major change process

HCA 545 Module 1 DQ 1

Using the example of a governance team following a major change process, discuss a situation in which you were involved. Include the problem, the team members involved, identification of stakeholders, processes followed, etc. How effective was the team approach? What major challenges did the team face and how were they resolved? What could your team have done to be more effective?

Answer:

In our course, we are learning about the importance of effective teams. To that end, we have been asked to write about a situation in which we were involved with a team and describe how effective it was.

I think that the most important part of being involved in an effective team is taking into consideration all viewpoints, including those that are different from your own.

For this assignment, I am going to use the example of a governance team following a major change process. This team was formed by the executive staff after they had gone through a major restructuring process and moved into a new building. The purpose of this committee was to make sure all stakeholders were informed about changes and any upcoming changes so that they could be prepared for them. They also wanted to make sure that everyone knew what their responsibilities were and where they should go for resources if needed.

This particular project was very successful because everyone involved took their time to listen to each other’s opinions and concerns before coming up with solutions or making decisions about how things would be handled moving forward.

The main challenge faced by this group was overcoming resistance from some employees who did not agree with some of the changes being made, specifically regarding how things would be organized within departments (such as who would report directly

In the past, I have been a part of many teams. I have been a part of governance teams, project management teams, and design teams. Today, I am going to talk about my experience with a governance team that was following a major change process.

I was involved in this team because I was one of the senior executives at the company who was responsible for leading the implementation of this change process. The problem was an increase in customer complaints about our products, which we suspected was due to quality issues with those products. We realized that we needed to address this issue by implementing new processes that would help us improve our quality standards across all departments so that we could meet or exceed customer expectations.

I was on this team along with my peers from each department within our company. We also had another executive from another company who had recently implemented similar processes and could share their experience with us as well as provide guidance on how best to proceed with implementation of these new processes within our own organization.

There were many stakeholders involved in this process because everyone had something at stake: customers wanted better products; employees wanted better working conditions; management wanted increased profits; etc.. In order for everyone’s needs to be met

In my career, I’ve been involved in a few governance teams. I’m going to use one example from a recent project that I’m particularly proud of.

The problem we were trying to solve was that our company had recently acquired another company and the process for integrating their data into our existing system was taking longer than expected. We needed to figure out what was causing the delay and come up with a plan for getting back on track.

Our team consisted of myself (the project manager), my boss (the executive sponsor), and several senior members of both teams. We met regularly over the course of about three months, but the most intensive portion lasted about two weeks.

We identified stakeholders as anyone who would be affected by or contribute to solving this problem: our two teams, plus any other stakeholders whose work could affect ours (like IT). We also identified processes we were following: meetings with both teams every week or two (depending on how busy we were), regular status updates via email and Slack, etc.

During meetings with both teams, we discussed the progress so far and brainstormed ideas for moving forward. Then we set aside time for one-on-one meetings between each team member and

Teamwork is a key part of the success of any organization. When faced with a major change, teams can be instrumental in managing the process and resolving issues before they become bigger problems.

The following example comes from a large health care organization that was undergoing a major change process. The team was made up of several members, including myself. We were assigned to work on a project related to patient care and management. The first step in our process was identifying stakeholders and internal users who would be impacted by our work. This gave us an idea of what questions we needed answers for as well as who we could ask for input on various aspects of our project.

Next came defining objectives for the team and outlining what we wanted to achieve over the course of three months or so. To do this, we had several meetings where everyone got together and shared their ideas about what they thought was most important within this particular area of healthcare management.

Finally, after agreeing on goals and objectives, it was time to move forward with implementing them through processes such as brainstorming sessions where ideas were shared among all members present at each meeting so no one person felt like they had all responsibility on their shoulders alone

I was part of a governance team that was trying to resolve a problem with one of our major clients. The client was experiencing problems with their online shopping cart, and they were not happy with the way our team handled it.

The problem was that we had implemented new technology to improve the customer experience, but then we realized that it caused some issues with their website. Our team identified that there were some bugs in our code and resolved those issues by changing it. However, this caused some other problems for them which we did not realize until later on in the process.

We were able to work through the situation by communicating well with each other and understanding where each person was coming from in terms of what they wanted out of this project and how they could help solve this issue together as a team rather than individually.

I was on a governance team that had to make a major decision regarding changes to our company’s corporate structure. We had just been acquired by another company, and the new owners wanted us to change the way we did things so that they could integrate us into their system more easily.

We first identified who would be affected by these changes—the employees whose jobs were in jeopardy because of them—and then we tried to understand what their needs were. We had weekly meetings where people could come and talk about what was going on with them, and we listened carefully for any concerns or fears that might affect how well they did their work, or how motivated they were to do it well.

Then we talked about our options: Should we keep things as they were, or should we make these changes? Should everyone stay where they are now, or should some people move around? What was best for each person individually as well as for the whole team?

We decided that it made sense to move some people around and also create a new position entirely (and two additional positions). Everyone agreed with this decision except one person who really wanted her old job back even though there wasn’t enough work for two people anymore. We talked through why this

When I was a student at the University of Phoenix, I had the opportunity to be part of a team that was tasked with revamping the school’s admissions process. We were told that we needed to make sure that students were making informed decisions about whether or not to attend our school.

To do this, we created a new flowchart outlining how students could get in touch with us and tell us what they wanted out of their education. We also created an online chatbot that would answer any questions a student might have about our programs and services.

This process took several months, but it worked! We saw an increase in enrollment from prospective students who were able to get in touch with someone who could answer their questions—and then enroll!

Question:

HCA 545 Module 1 DQ 1

Using the example of a governance team following a major change process, discuss a situation in which you were involved. Include the problem, the team members involved, identification of stakeholders, processes followed, etc. How effective was the team approach? What major challenges did the team face and how were they resolved? What could your team have done to be more effective?

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