HCA 545 Module 3 DQ 2 Refer to “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington

HCA 545 Module 3 DQ 2

Refer to “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation” in your assigned readings. Choose three issues that are considered critical according to the report and analyze how your community measures up, especially in the realm of health care response preparedness.

Answer:

As a health care professional, it’s important to know how your community measures up in the realm of emergency response preparedness.

One way to do this is by looking at the report “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation.” It outlines three issues that are considered critical according to the report:

1. Pre-existing medical conditions

2. Access to health care services

3. Access to transportation services

These three factors will be examined in greater detail below.

The report “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation” gives a detailed account of the impact of a small nuclear weapon on Washington, D.C., including recommendations for how to respond to such an event. The report is particularly focused on health care preparedness and response, so I thought it would be interesting to look at how our community measures up in that area.

The first issue that I chose as most critical according to the report was food supply availability. The report states that “at least 72 hours are required for distribution of emergency food supplies to vulnerable populations after an attack has been detected” (p. 67). In our community, we have plenty of food already stored away in pantries or refrigerators—this seems like it would be an easy fix!

Second, the report states that “initial treatment at a local hospital may not be sufficient for these victims because of their high radiation exposure levels; therefore, they require immediate evacuation from the area” (p. 68). While this might seem scary at first glance, it actually isn’t all that different from what we do now: when someone arrives at

This article will address three issues that are considered critical according to the report and analyze how your community measures up, especially in the realm of health care response preparedness:

1. Preparedness for mass casualties, including victims with radiation exposure

2. Coordination between emergency medical services and public health agencies

3. Use of shelters

Preparedness for mass casualties, including victims with radiation exposure: The first issue is preparedness for mass casualties, which includes victims with radiation exposure. In our community, we have a local hospital that is a Level I trauma center. This means that it has the resources necessary to treat patients with life-threatening injuries or illnesses. For this reason, it is important that they are prepared to handle mass casualties following an event like a nuclear detonation in DC. They have developed plans in partnership with other local hospitals and health care providers so that they can work together if needed during an emergency situation like this one (https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/dc-hospital-systems-prepare-for-mass-casualties-from-nuclear-attack/2019/03/13/dfe1a82e-4b19-11e9 -856c0f

If you’re like me, you’re probably wondering how your community measures up to the standard for protecting citizens from the effects of nuclear weapons.

I chose to read “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendations,” which was published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2018. The report is based on a study conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

The report gave three recommendations that were deemed critical to protecting Washington, DC residents from the impact of nuclear weapons:

1. A better understanding of how people would respond in the event of a nuclear detonation;

2. Improved communication systems that would allow emergency responders to communicate with one another; and

3. Increased funding for public health research into how communities can prepare for nuclear attacks.

In the report “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendations”, the authors assess a number of issues—including the potential impact of the blast and radiation, evacuations, and medical treatment—that would be important to consider in any emergency response situation.

The report notes that while it’s impossible to predict how a nuclear bomb might affect your community, there are certain steps you can take to prepare for such an event. One of those steps is learning about how other communities have responded to similar events; another is practicing evacuation plans with your family or colleagues.

One thing I found particularly interesting about this report was its emphasis on getting medical care after an explosion has taken place. That’s because most people think about sheltering in place when they hear about nuclear bombs going off, but taking care of yourself after the initial blast is just as important as staying safe from it in the first place!

Small nuclear weapons are becoming more and more of a threat to the United States, with the North Korean regime being the most recent example. It’s important to understand how our communities would be affected by such an event, as well as what we can do to prepare for it.

The first thing to understand is that small nuclear weapons have different effects on different areas of Washington, DC. For example, some parts of Washington could suffer from radiation poisoning while others would not. This means that hospitals should be prepared for mass casualties from radiation poisoning but also should have enough supplies on hand for those who don’t experience any physical effects from exposure.

The second thing to understand is that emergency response recommendations vary depending on whether or not the incident occurs during business hours or during off-hours. For example, if it happens during business hours then emergency response personnel will need access to their vehicles so they can respond quickly and effectively; however, if they can’t get into their vehicles then they’ll have trouble getting around town in order to help those who need them most—those who are suffering from radiation poisoning!

The third thing to understand is that people without access

Washington, DC is a city that has experienced an atomic bomb attack before. In 1955, a B-29 bomber carrying the equivalent of 1.7 kilotons of TNT overflew the city, and Washingtonians were exposed to fallout from the mushroom cloud.

The findings of the report are not surprising: many people in Washington, DC would be killed or injured by a nuclear weapon being detonated in the same location today.

The authors of the report recommend that hospitals have plans in place to deal with mass casualties as soon as possible after a nuclear detonation occurs. They also recommend that hospitals have access to all necessary supplies so they can treat patients immediately after an attack. Finally, they recommend that hospitals be prepared to treat patients for radiation exposure if necessary (such as with potassium iodide).

In our city today, these recommendations are not being met by many hospitals—and we need to do better if we want to survive another atomic bomb attack!

Question:

HCA 545 Module 3 DQ 2

Refer to “Impact of Small Nuclear Weapons on Washington, DC: Outcomes and Emergency Response Recommendation” in your assigned readings. Choose three issues that are considered critical according to the report and analyze how your community measures up, especially in the realm of health care response preparedness.

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