HCA 699 Topic 6 DQ 1 When reviewing the literature and different types of evidence

HCA 699 Topic 6 DQ 1

When reviewing the literature and different types of evidence, there are often gaps in the findings. Are such gaps a help or a hindrance when wanting to create a change?

Answer:

When reviewing the literature and different types of evidence, there are often gaps in the findings. Are such gaps a help or a hindrance when wanting to create a change?

Gaps in research and evidence are always going to be a hindrance when trying to make changes because it can leave you with false information that might not be fully accurate. If there are no studies done on something, then it’s more than likely that there is no evidence that can show how well something works or doesn’t work. When this happens, it makes it harder for you to decide whether or not a change should be made because you don’t have any proof that one thing is better than another option.

For example, let’s say that I want to create a change in how we treat people with mental health issues at our facility but there aren’t any studies out there about how effective certain treatments are when compared against others. This means that I would have no way of knowing if changing things up would actually help patients feel better or worse about themselves overall which means my idea wouldn’t go anywhere fast!

Gaps are a hindrance when you want to create change.

Gaps in the findings of literature can be a help when you’re reviewing the literature and different types of evidence, as they allow you to form your own opinion on what is true and what isn’t. But when it comes to creating change, some gaps can be problematic because they may make it difficult for people to understand what is going on and how they can help.

For example, if we’re trying to develop a new vaccine for a disease that affects only one percent of the population, there may not be enough research available about this disease. This could lead people who are working on developing the vaccine to think that there’s no point in doing further research on it because there aren’t enough people affected by it. However, if there were more research available about this disease, then people would be able to see how many people are affected by it and how serious an issue it is—which would encourage them to continue working on developing new vaccines for this disease even though only one percent of people are affected by it.

Gaps in the findings are a hindrance when wanting to create a change.

There are many different types of evidence, including:

-Quantitative evidence (numbers)

-Qualitative evidence (qualities)

-Empirical evidence (testing)

-Historical evidence (past events)

-Scientific evidence (scientific studies)

I believe that gaps are a help when trying to create a change.

The reason for this is that when we look at the research, it is often not clear what is going on. For example, if we look at the literature on smoking and lung cancer, it might be unclear whether smoking causes lung cancer or whether people who have lung cancer also smoke more than average. So when we have these gaps in our evidence and knowledge, it allows us to explore different ways of thinking about what is going on.

For example, if I was trying to create a change around smoking and lung cancer, I would be able to ask myself: “Is there another way to think about why people might smoke?” And then maybe I could come up with some ideas like “People smoke because they feel stressed” or “People smoke because they want to look cool”. These new ideas may help me understand why people are smoking so much and how I can help them stop doing so—which could lead me into creating a new change!

Gaps in the literature can be a hindrance when creating change.

If there are gaps in the literature, this means that there is a gap in our knowledge about the subject. This can be a hindrance because it means that we need to do more research in order to learn more about a topic and make change. We don’t want to implement change based on incomplete information, because we could end up making things worse!

However, gaps in the literature can also be helpful when creating change. If there are gaps in the literature, then we know that there is an area that needs attention—and as long as we treat those gaps as opportunities for further research instead of roadblocks to progress, they can help us create better outcomes.

Gaps in the literature are a hindrance when trying to create change.

The literature is not always complete, and it’s possible that the information you’re looking for may not be available. The problem is compounded by the fact that there are often multiple sources of incomplete data, so it can be difficult to get an accurate picture of what’s going on.

It’s important to note that issues with access to healthcare are not new—and they’re not going away anytime soon. We need more research in order to understand how we can better serve our patients’ needs.

Gaps in the research are a hindrance when wanting to create a change, because it means we don’t have enough information to make informed decisions.

For example, if I’m trying to decide whether or not to go vegan and I look at the research on how healthy that would be for me personally, it’s going to be hard to make an informed decision. There just isn’t enough information available about what happens when people become vegan.

And even if there were more information available from studies on vegans, that wouldn’t mean it applies directly to me—I might be one of those people who does not thrive on a vegan diet. So even though there is some research out there about what happens when people go vegan, it doesn’t mean it’s necessarily helpful for me personally.

In this case, we would say that the lack of information was a hindrance because it meant that I couldn’t make an informed decision.

Question:

HCA 699 Topic 6 DQ 1

When reviewing the literature and different types of evidence, there are often gaps in the findings. Are such gaps a help or a hindrance when wanting to create a change?

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