HCA 699 Topic 6 DQ 2 What is the difference between statistically significant evidence

HCA 699 Topic 6 DQ 2

What is the difference between statistically significant evidence and clinically significant evidence? How would each of these findings be used to advance an evidenced-based project?

Answer:

There is a difference between statistically significant evidence and clinically significant evidence. For example, a study that shows that a medication reduces the risk of heart attacks by 50% is statistically significant, but if it doesn’t actually reduce the number of heart attacks by 50%, it’s not clinically significant. Clinical significance is what matters most to patients and physicians.

A study showing that a medication reduces the risk of heart attacks by 50% would be used to advance an evidenced-based project because it provides evidence that the treatment works. This information can be used to make decisions about whether or not to prescribe this medication for patients who are at high risk for heart attack, or whether or not to offer this medication as an alternative treatment for those who have already had heart attacks and need a new way to prevent them from happening again.

It’s important to remember that just because something is statistically significant doesn’t mean that it’s clinically significant—or vice versa!

The difference between statistically significant evidence and clinically significant evidence is that statistically significant evidence is a result that is unlikely to be due to chance, whereas clinically significant evidence shows that there is a positive impact on the outcome of interest.

Clinically significant evidence would help advance an evidenced-based project by showing that there is a strong correlation between two things—for example, if you found that smoking was linked with lung cancer and heart disease, then this would be an example of clinically significant evidence. This type of information could help support the need for further research into how smoking impacts these diseases or it might lead directly to changes in treatment protocol at hospitals and other medical facilities around the world.

Statistically significant evidence and clinically significant evidence are two different things. The first is a method of assessing the strength of an association between variables, while the second refers to the level of importance that a finding has.

Statistically significant evidence is used to determine whether or not there is a correlation between two variables. If there’s no correlation, then it’s not possible for one variable to cause another, so there’s no reason for further investigation into it. However, if there is a correlation between two variables, then it’s worth investigating further—for example, by using other methods like case studies and controlled experiments in order to get more information about what might be causing this relationship between variables.

Clinically significant evidence is used to assess whether or not a treatment or medication is effective at treating whatever condition it was meant for (e.g., preventing heart disease). This type of assessment would use statistical methods but would focus on outcomes rather than correlations since they’re looking at what happens when people take certain medications or undergo certain treatments.

Question:

HCA 699 Topic 6 DQ 2

What is the difference between statistically significant evidence and clinically significant evidence? How would each of these findings be used to advance an evidenced-based project?

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