HCA 255 Health laws are passed by the legislative branch of federal and state governments

HCA 255 TOPIC 1 DQ 2

Health laws are passed by the legislative branch of federal and state governments. These laws often rely upon allocating funds to the executive branch to enforce them.  Please provide an example of a historic law that was passed at the federal or state level that is not currently funded for enforcement.

Answer:

Unfortunately, the number of federal and state laws is growing.  Invariably, some will be passed and not fully funded for monitoring or enforcement.  To assess an example of such a law, we can look at laws concerning seat belts for adults and children in vehicles. Most states have laws mandating that adults must wear seat belts to the extent allowed by their vehicle’s design. Few apply this requirement to small children, although many do require that booster seats be used for children under a certain age, weight, or height. The failure to enforce these laws when small children are riding in cars with only one adult is a major risk factor for death from injury suffered by automobile rollover accidents.

The implementation of smoking bans in the United States is a good example of this type of law.  Many states and cities have implemented smoking bans restricting individuals from smoking in public areas and workplaces.  In 2003, the United States Congress attempted to pass the Smoking Reduction and Electronic Vapor Alternatives Act.  This act would have provided up to $250 million of funding over two years to state and local governments for tobacco-related programs.

A startling $2 trillion is spent annually in the United States on efforts to address obesity; and yet, childhood obesity has tripled in the last three decades.  Only three percent of state governments have taken specific steps to stem the tide of childhood obesity, such as introducing legislation or funding related programs.  In honor of National Children’s Health Week, today we present you with this post that sheds light on just how much work there is left to do in our country to combat childhood obesity for the sake of our kids’ health.

The nursing field is one of the most rapidly expanding areas of health science due to shortage. Nurses are expected to make quick and accurate decisions while under pressure from supervisors, doctors, patients, their families and other team members. The ability of a nurse to concentrate on the task at hand must not be compromised by the intrinsic safety risks that would otherwise exist when performing nursing duties.

For example, the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act was passed by Congress in 1993 at the federal level. At that time Congress allocated funds to the Department of Justice to administer background checks for those wishing to purchase firearms from a dealer. The implementation of this act has been delayed due to lack of funding and full time staff at the DOJ.

An example of a law that is not enforced, is the national speed limit for passenger vehicles. In 1974, Congress enacted and President Ford signed into law H.R. 9066, which mandated that all passenger motor vehicles manufactured in the United States after 1/1/75 had to have a maximum speed governor device installed. Everyone knows that it has been difficult to enforce this law since President Nixon first proclaimed it in 1973. Many sources have cited the reason for this being due to the lack of funding. Congress did not fund it, so the officers on the ground did not have a way to enforce it. Drivers themselves were not interested in regulating their speed because they believed it was an invasion of privacy and unconstitutional.”

In 1993, the United States Congress passed a law that required states to create their own program for children’s health insurance. This program was called CHIP (Child Health Insurance Program). According to the Children’s Defense Fund, in 2017 alone, Congress provided funding to expand CHIP from 11 to 19 states (18.8 million children were insured through CHIP), and also extended funding for several more years. Unfortunately, this program is still underfunded: with 18.8 million children left uninsured using the current coverage standards of Obamacare.

The Zero Emissions Buildings Act of 2010 was signed into law to achieve the following:

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), as of July 2004, states have enacted 126 laws to implement the IDEA. These laws allow public agencies, such as school districts, to receive federal financial assistance for assisting children with disabilities. The U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) provides funding and guidance on how to apply these laws. OSERS requires that special education funds be used for the education and service of a child with disabilities in the least restrictive environment appropriate for his or her needs; this is known as Least Restrictive Environment or LRE. Although funding for LRE compliance is available through OSERS, it is not being used as intended by Congress. When a school district fails to comply with IDEA requirements, parents can file a complaint with the local Office of Civil Rights (OCR). Parents should first try to resolve their complaints through mediation with school district staff; if they are unable to do so, they may file a disability rights complaint with OCR. Complaints are then investigated by OCR, typically resulting in enforcement activities that may include corrective actions, resolution agreements with the involved parties, technical assistance to improve compliance efforts, or civil action in federal

The National Voter Registration Act of 1993 required state governments to offer voter registration for all citizens. This law was challenged by state legislatures and the Supreme Court, making the matter a federal case.

Question:

Health laws are passed by the legislative branch of federal and state governments. These laws often rely upon allocating funds to the executive branch to enforce them.  Please provide an example of a historic law that was passed at the federal or state level that is not currently funded for enforcement.

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