NURS 6670 John is a 20-year-old male who is referred to treatment by his father.

John is a 20-year-old male who is referred to treatment by his father.

Answer:

There is limited information about the homicidal teenager. John is a 20-year-old male who is referred by his father for treatment. There is no PMHNP’s evaluation. The two of them move in after 6 weeks later of murder of his mother. The father says that he doesn’t cope well from the beginning, but 2 weeks ago he is depressed and see voices telling him that he could have saved his mother. John becomes so agitated that the emergency room brought him to the emergency room.

When a person is having thoughts that they are responsible for a loved one’s death, they are experiencing a very difficult time. It can be helpful to have someone to talk with who has training in responding to these emotions. That is why treatment for John needs to include talking with a PMHNP like the one who wrote this tip!

Immediate treatment for John should include providing a safe environment with a trusted friend or family member present. It would also be helpful to encourage his father to gently monitor and limit any access to the Internet, particularly violent or disturbing news reports about the murder of John’s mother.

You have been referred to treatment by your father. I know how hard it is to lose a loved one. Your mother was a nurse, you’re close, and she was killed in a tragic shooting. You and your father are struggling to cope with the loss of your mother and waking up every day without her. It’s hard not having your mother there for you right now. That’s why your father brought you here today. He just wants what’s best for you, and he thinks this will help.

Mental health issues can be triggered by life’s many challenges. Tragic loss and overwhelming grief provide the backdrop for poor mental health due to unresolved trauma and stress. After the loss of a loved one, it is not uncommon to become sad, depressed, angry, and anxious — even talk about suicide. Seeking treatment immediately is vital because untreated grief reactions can develop into long-term depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

After a loved one is lost, you may have mixed feelings. The first thing you need to do is take care of yourself. This can be hard to do after a loss. Some people may be very sad and cry for a long time. Others may feel very angry or guilty. This is normal, but it does not last forever. Soon you will be able to feel again and move forward with your life.

Focus on the issues that are most urgent to the client.

Question:

John is a 20-year-old male who is referred to treatment by his father. The two of them live together following the murder of John’s mother 6 weeks ago. It was a tragic occurrence; John’s mother was a nurse at an inner-city hospital and was killed as an innocent bystander in a drive-by shooting. John was very close to his mother, and in the last 3 weeks he has been increasingly distraught. His dad says he did not cope well from the beginning, but for the last 2 weeks he has been agitated, combative, and is hearing voices telling him that he could have saved his mother. He has become so agitated that his father brought him to the emergency room. The PMHNP knows that immediate treatment for John should include:

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