Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – Differentiating PTSD from panic and generalized anxiety disorders

Differentiating PTSD from panic and generalized anxiety disorders can be challenging

Answer:

Differentiating PTSD from panic and generalized anxiety disorders can be challenging. Which of the following statements provides the strongest support for PTSD vs the other two differential diagnoses?

The one answer that differentiates between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and that provides strong support for PTSD vs the other two differential diagnoses is the following:

You have been asked to prepare a patient education activity that will teach participants how to differentiate among post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. You have complete freedom in choosing the topic, content, and format of your learning activity as long as it is presented in 15 to 20 min time frame.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the differential diagnosis for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder is challenging for many nurses to differentiate between. Having knowledge of the symptoms and how the diagnoses differ is integral when making the correct decision for the course of action for each patient being treated. Many patients with attempts at suicide have a preexisting depression, anxiety or other mental disorder. Differentiating PTSD from panic and generalized anxiety disorders can be challenging

When attempting to differentiate between problem-focused coping and emotion-focused coping, nurses should keep in mind that problem-focused coping is concerned with the alleviation of the stressor itself, whereas emotion-focused coping is concerned with the alleviation of the emotional distress. In addition, it is also important for nurses to consider whether or not the patient is exhibiting efforts at productive avoidance.

PTSD is characterized by recurrent, intrusive memories of a traumatic event.

The better question is what PTSD is not. Many make the mistake of assuming that PTSD cannot be diagnosed in a toddler, but this is inaccurate. To complete this tutorial, you must know how to address the key symptoms for PTSD and read about the disorder on Iowa College Student Aid Commission website. When it comes to the most common symptoms of PTSD, sleep disturbance and appetite changes are the culprits. Knowing these symptoms is helpful when keying in on certain elements of a personal statement for nursing school or even just as a military physician doing your duty to propose to servicemembers for disability benefits under one of several conditions.

Trauma can take many forms, but the long-term effects of living through a trauma can be similar whether it is physical or emotional trauma. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is classified by three core symptoms: intrusion, avoidance, and arousal. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – 4th Edition (DSM-IV) further subdivides the diagnosis into eight separate diagnostic criteria. Differentiating PTSD from panic and generalized anxiety disorders can be challenging.

Question:

Differentiating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder can be challenging. Which of the following provides the strongest support for PTSD vs the other two differential diagnoses?

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