NURS 6670 The PMHNP is asked to evaluate the parent of one of her existing patients a 49-year-old woman named Sheri.

The PMHNP is asked to evaluate the parent of one of her existing patients a 49-year-old woman named Sheri.

Answer:

The most likely cause of this presentation is that two days ago Sheri’s father underwent what is medically known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA), sometimes referred to a mini-stroke. This medical scenario requires urgent medical intervention, as the longer Sheri’s father continues to have TIA’s, the more damage will be done to his brain, which will result in permanent damage and possibly death. The total time between each episode of mental confusion might be months or even years—the term for these episodes is not used again until an individual has their second TIA.

You have been asked to evaluate the father of a patient who you have been treating for several months. When you arrive at his home, you find him to be overtly confused, not recognizing his daughter at first. As a professional nurse, which diagnostic test do you most likely administer first?

The most likely cause of this presentation is early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Sheri?s father has developed delirium, the most common cause of acute cognitive dysfunction, and this is a serious situation. Delirium causes the affected person to have a sudden change in mental status that is characterized by decreased ability to focus and think clearly, decreased awareness of surroundings, and pliable train of thought. This is an emergent condition that requires immediate action to prevent further deterioration. If immediate assessment, treatment, and discharge are not appropriate for this case scenario and the patient does not begin to improve within 72 hours after assessment and commencement of treatment, re-assessment for other causes must be done prior to beginning a long-term management program.The PMHNP is asked to evaluate the parent of one of her existing patients a 49-year-old woman named Sheri.

This question tests your ability to read and integrate information, apply critical thinking strategies, and demonstrate a complete understanding of the clinical situation given in the scenario. The most likely cause of this presentation is an acute confusional state secondary to methanol toxicity.

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The most likely cause of this presentation is Acute confusional state.

Alzheimer’s Disease is a progressive, degenerative cognitive disorder, characterized by loss of memory, impaired language ability, and grossly impaired judgment. This disease is progressive in nature and symptoms usually start out subtly and then increase with time. Early memory loss is often attributed to stress and the effects of aging. As the disease progresses, patients gradually display general confusion about time, place, and persons. Although these symptoms may vary slightly with each patient, they will be present in some manner.

Signs and Symptoms: Mild to severe confusion, impaired orientation, deficits in short and long term memory, language difficulties and difficulty with tasks such as paying bills or doing laundry.

The presenting problem statement is a person who has been diagnosed with a disease. This presents a challenge to the family and the physician because each group will have to come to terms with many difficult decisions that must be made.

Question:

The PMHNP is asked to evaluate the parent of one of her existing patients a 49-year-old woman named Sheri. Sheri reports that her father, a 78-year-old man who lives alone, has always been in good health. However, when Sheri went to have breakfast with him this past Sunday, she found her father overtly confused and he did not even seem to recognize her at first. Sheri is concerned that he has Alzheimer’s disease, and she is amazed because two days prior he was ?completely fine.? The PMHNP knows that the most likely cause of this presentation is:

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